If you want to learn how to draw a car on paper, chances are you’ve tried already and made a bit of a mess of it. Don’t worry, nobody can create a masterpiece right away; it takes time and practice before you can learn how to draw a car on paper and make it look really good. So how do you do it and can you speed up the process? I’ll give you some tips and answer that question so you can draw a realistic car today!

One of the most frustrating parts of drawing is when you make an error with a line or shading and you’ve pressed too hard on the paper. This does two things, one it creates an indent in the paper which will ruin further shading when rubbing over the indent and it will be much harder to rub out. So you furiously try your hardest to rub out the pencil and you end up with horrid smudge marks and a drawing that will be hard to rescue.

To avoid falling into this trap, make sure your never gripping your pencil too hard. Be sure to use a light pencil in your primary foundation sketches and keep check of how hard your putting your pencil on paper. I find that the longer I am drawing, the harder I start pressing down on the paper.

Another thing I see happening a lot when people start drawing is bad proportions and mismatched sized. The use of a grid (1inchx1inch) will help you tremendously. It will allow you to adjust your tyres, windows and compare them to the grid to make sure they are accurately sized in comparison with the rest of your drawing. On top of this it is also very useful when creating a line ratio to project your side view to a vanishing point.

The biggest mistake however is when people give up too quickly. If you take a look at one of your drawings while your doing it and decide it looks terrible and scrap it, your never going to learn how to correct your mistakes. Take your time and fix things up and train your brain to draw the right line every time. It takes time, but eventually you will get faster and faster until you know how to draw a car on paper in a very short time.



Source by Alex Simpson