Since the late 1990’s, citrus cleaners have occupied a large space in the domestic solvents market. From dusting solutions that fill a room with lemon scent to disinfectants that claim to use “citrus power” to kill germs, almost every type of domestic cleaner is now available in citrus form. From a consumer perspective, the benefits of purchasing citrus cleaners are two: they offer a more pleasing scent than traditional cleaners and they claim to be more “natural” than traditional cleaners. But, while the first benefit is indisputable, the second benefit requires careful consideration. Although “natural” implies “organic”, any cleaning solution that contains natural ingredients can claim to be natural, regardless of how healthy it is for the environment. As a result, those who mistake “natural” to mean “organic” fall conveniently within some solvent companies marketing plans.

Although the quest for organic cleaners seems to occur on a domestic level, large companies also have interest in finding organic cleaners, but for reasons that usually supercede environmental friendliness. One reason that companies seek organic cleaners is to reduce toxic emissions, which can result in emissions credits that are tradable to other companies. A second reason that companies seek organic cleaners is to reduce their waste removal costs. A third reason that companies seek organic cleaners is to avoid having to replace a critical solvent when its use is prohibited or limited by EPA regulations. On an industrial level, the quest to find an industrial organic cleaner is not complicated by whether a cleaner is “natural” or “organic”, but whether it is “environmentally preferred” or “environmentally safe”. A solution that is environmentally preferable is “better” for the environment that than its traditional counterparts, while a solution that is environmentally safe is completely safe for environment.

Even in today’s environmentally sensitive cleaning solutions market, the presence of an environmentally safe industrial citrus degreaser is rare. But one orange degreaser that provides an exception to the rule is VORTEX, which relies solely on citrus power to complete the heaviest degreasing and cleaning jobs, including the removal of tar, asphalt and bitumen. Unlike most industrial cleaners, VORTEX is biodegradable, contains no hazardous air pollutants (HAPs), no petroleum distillates and no hazardous materials or listed solvents. For large companies, VORTEX is the perfect answer for developing emissions credits; reducing waste removal costs and avoiding EPA regulated solvents. But VORTEX is also applicable as a domestic degreaser and cleaning solvent. Easy to dilute and available in large and small quantities, VORTEX can be purchased direct from the manufacturer and used for the heaviest or lightest and cleaning jobs, from degreasing a car motor to removing everyday dirt and grime.



Source by Timothy Byron